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10 Resistance Band Leg Exercises For At-Home Lower-Body Workouts

trainer kehinde anjorin performing quadruped resistance band leg exercise

Kathryn Wirsing

Don’t get me wrong; I love using weights to build stronger, more defined legs—but it IS absolutely possible to see results without them. Whether you’re working out at home from a teeny-tiny bedroom or just need a break from the dumbbells, kettlebells, and barbells (oh my!), do yourself a favor and give resistance band leg workouts a chance.

But how can you possible reap major benefits with just resistance bands—especially if you’re used to hitting the weights? Two simple tactics make a world of difference.

The first: unilateral (a.k.a. single-leg) exercises, which require your working leg to fire double-time. And the second: tempo work, in which you slow down your pace to increase the amount of time your muscles spend under tension (or actively engaged), ultimately increasing the stress you put on them and boosting the results you see.

Trust me, DIY a workout with the resistance band leg exercises here and you’ll never underestimate this super-simple piece of equipment ever again. Your entire lower body, from your glutes to your quads to your hamstrings, will be torched for days.

Time: 15 minutes

Equipment: long resistance band, box (or another sturdy, elevated surface, like a stair)

Good for: legs, lower-body

Instructions: Choose four exercises below. Perform 15 reps of each, then continue onto the next, resting only as needed. After you’ve finished all of your movements, rest for at least one minute. Then, repeat three times more for a total of four rounds.

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1

Banded Curtsy Lunge

Muscles worked: quads, glutes, hamstrings

How to: Start standing with feet hip-width apart, a long resistance band beneath arch of right foot, and one end of the band in either hand at chest-height, elbows bent and close to body. Take a big step back with left leg, crossing it behind right side. Bend knees and lower hips until right thigh is nearly parallel to the floor. Keep torso upright and hips and shoulders as square as possible. Return to start. That’s one rep. Perform 15 on each side, then continue on to your next move, resting as needed. After you’ve finished all of your exercises (remember, you’re doing four total), rest for one minute, then repeat the entire workout three times more for a total of four rounds.

Pro tip: Press right knee outward throughout movement to engage side-butt (a.k.a. glute medius) muscle.

2

Banded Front Squat

Muscles worked: quads, glutes, hamstrings

How to: Stand on the middle of the resistance band with feet hip-width apart, holding one end of the band in either hand. Bend arms to bring hands up next to ears, and lift elbows up until triceps are parallel to the floor and narrow. This is your starting position. Keeping arms still, engage core and bend at knees to sink hips back and down until thighs are parallel to floor. Press through feet to extend legs and return to standing. That’s one rep. Perform 15, then continue on to your next

Man yanks out two teeth with rusty pliers after he couldn’t book dentist appointment

A desperate man resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out after being unable to book a dentist appointment.

Chris Savage performed the self-dentistry in his bedroom because he could not register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, saying it was the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done.’

The 42 year old said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, saying that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain.’

The labourer admitted he had to get ‘very drunk’ by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited another 24 hours to pull the second out – this time sober.

Chris said he was in ‘agony’ for days

Mr Savage, from Southsea in Portsmouth, said: “I ended up having to get very drunk the first time.

“Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

“I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt.

“So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris used a rusty set of pliers to take the teeth out

“It was a proper yank, a grip and pull – there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.”

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father of three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton, Hants, three years ago.

The teeth Chris pulled out himself

He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

“It was like a massive game of pass the parcel”, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown, leaving him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

Chris lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year

He said: “I could’ve waited a week – borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic conditions but there was no way I could’ve waited.

“Hygiene wasn’t going through my head, it was just ‘get this out’ – but the relief was worth it.

“The squelch noise as you pull

Supercomputer shows humidity effect on COVID-19 [Video]

Researchers have used the Fugaku supercomputer to model the emission and flow of virus-like particles from infected people in a variety of indoor environments.

Air humidity of lower than 30% resulted in more than double the amount of aerosolised particles compared to levels of 60% or higher,

as seen in simulations released on Tuesday (October 13) by research giant Riken and Kobe University.

Their findings suggest that the use of humidifiers may help limit infections during times when window ventilation is not possible.

The study also indicated that clear face shields are not as effective as tighter-fitting face masks in preventing the spread of aerosols.

Other findings showed the number of singers in choirs for example should be limited and spaced out.

There has been a growing consensus among health experts that the COVID-19 virus can be spread through the air.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revised its guidance this month to say the pathogen can linger in the air for hours.

Video Transcript

Researchers have used the Fugaku supercomputer to model the emission and flow of virus-like particles from infected people in a variety of indoor environments. Air humidity of lower than 30% resulted in more than double the amount of aerosolized particles compared to levels of 60% or higher. As seen in simulations released on Tuesday by research giant [INAUDIBLE] and Colby University.

Their findings suggest that the use of humidifiers may help limit infections during times when window ventilation is not possible. The study also indicated that clear face shields are not as effective as tighter fitting face masks in preventing the spread of aerosols.

Other findings showed the number of singers in choirs, for example, should be limited and spaced out. There has been a growing consensus among health experts that the COVID-19 virus can be spread through the air. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revised its guidance this month to say the pathogen can linger in the air for hours.

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Man who couldn’t see a dentist pulls out own teeth

  • Chris Savage, 42, pulled out two of his own teeth at home in Southsea last week
  • Labourer lost his income during lockdown and couldn’t get a dental appointment
  • Portsmouth South MP called Mr Savage’s case ‘another example of the sad consequences of the Government failing to provide service levels required’ 

A labourer who lost his income during lockdown pulled out two of his own teeth with pliers and downed eight cans of Stella Artois to numb the pain because he couldn’t get a dental appointment due to the coronavirus crisis.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, calling last Thursday’s procedure ‘the most horrible thing I’ve ever done’.

He said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’.

The labourer, from Southsea in Portsmouth, Hampshire, admitted to getting ‘very drunk’ beforehand by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited a day before pulling out the second tooth.

His case has now been raised with the NHS by a health watchdog who said Mr Savage has been ‘severely let down’ by services in the city.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment
The labourer said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull — there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton three years ago. He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive

UK shielders on the rise in Covid cases

People vulnerable to Covid because of their health say they feel forgotten, anxious and unsupported despite new government advice to to take extra precautions due to a sharp rise in coronavirus infections in England.



Boris Johnson riding a bicycle on a city street: Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Support worker Marie-Louise Anacoura, one of more than 2 million people on the government’s shielding list in England, says not enough is being done to protect those who are vulnerable. Noting that most people on the list will not be advised to stay home, Anacoura, 49, adds: “I have COPD [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease] and I’m very apprehensive of getting coronavirus. I think shielding should be mandatory as it’s the only way I’ll be able to stay at home and not work.”



Boris Johnson riding a bicycle on a city street: A news display features Boris Johnson as shoppers make their way along the streets of Manchester.


© Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images
A news display features Boris Johnson as shoppers make their way along the streets of Manchester.

Anacoura shielded until 1 August when she returned to work caring for a patient she has treated for 12 years. “I only go out to work and back, and I cover the night shifts on my own so I don’t have to mingle with others,” she says. “He [the patient] likes to go out during the day which is difficult for me, but I can’t, and won’t, not let him have a life.

“There is a pressure to keep working because I can’t expect my colleagues to continue to cover for me when shielding is not mandatory. It’s dangerous for me to work while the country is like this.”

She feels the government has “forgotten” about those who are at high risk of catching Covid. “The cases are rising and they’re doing nothing about the vulnerable. I understand that for some people shielding can be isolating, but I’m more anxious now than I was at the start of the pandemic, and I know I wouldn’t survive if I got it.”

This anxiety is shared by Jane Carter, an administrator in Bristol who has sarcoidosis, a rare inflammatory disease that usually affects the lungs and skin. “It’s quite scary but I’m incredibly lucky that my employer has been clear I should work from home,” says Carter, 46.

“I’m so concerned about how the government is communicating with us,” she adds. “I feel strongly that advisory shielding should be back in place. I’m aware some people don’t want to shield, and that is fine, but it came with a level of protection that is now not present.”

Carter lives on her own and is concerned she no longer gets enough exercise because she is anxious about going out. “I don’t move about as much and I have limited space. I did my own shopping during the summer but since cases have been rising I’ve gone back to online deliveries. I love living alone but I do wonder sometimes how long I will stay content with the situation as it is.

“It’s much scarier now we’ve seen how the virus affects people. I feel like I’m definitely

Taysha Gene Therapies Receives Rare Pediatric Disease Designation and Orphan Drug Designation for TSHA-102 as a Treatment for Rett Syndrome

Program leverages novel miRARE platform technology used to control transgene expression on a cellular basis

TSHA-102 anticipated to submit Investigational New Drug application in 2021

Taysha Gene Therapies Inc. (Nasdaq: TSHA), a patient-centric gene therapy company focused on developing and commercializing AAV-based gene therapies for the treatment of monogenic diseases of the central nervous system in both rare and large patient populations, today announced that it has received rare pediatric disease designation and orphan drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for TSHA-102, an AAV9-based gene therapy in development for the treatment of Rett syndrome. Taysha anticipates that it will submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for TSHA-102 to the FDA in 2021.

Rett syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of severe intellectual disability worldwide, with a prevalence of over 25,000 cases in the U.S. and European Union (EU). It is an X-linked disease that primarily occurs in females, but it can be seen very rarely in males. It is usually recognized in children between six to 18 months of age as they begin to miss developmental milestones or lose abilities they had developed. Individuals with Rett syndrome also show symptoms that include loss of speech, loss of purposeful use of hands, loss of mobility, seizures, cardiac impairments, breathing issues and sleep disturbances.

“Patients with Rett syndrome are currently managed with symptomatic treatments as there are no therapies approved to treat the underlying cause of disease,” said Berge Minassian, M.D., Chief Medical Advisor of Taysha and Chief of Pediatric Neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UT Southwestern). Dr. Minassian is credited with describing the CNS isoform of the MECP2 gene which is responsible for neuronal and synaptic function throughout the brain. “Gene therapy offers a potentially curative option for patients suffering with Rett syndrome.”

Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. TSHA-102 is designed to deliver a healthy version of the MECP2 gene as well as the miRNA-Responsive Auto-Regulatory Element, miRARE, platform technology to control the level of MECP2 expression. “TSHA-102 represents an important step forward in the field of gene therapy, where we are leveraging a novel regulatory platform called miRARE to prevent the overexpression of MECP2,” said Steven Gray, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Advisor of Taysha and Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern. “In collaboration with Sarah Sinnett, Ph.D. to develop miRARE, our goal was to design a regulated construct that allowed us to control MECP2 expression to potentially avoid adverse events that are typically seen with unregulated gene therapies.”

The FDA defines a rare pediatric disease as a serious or life-threatening disease in which the disease manifestations primarily affect individuals aged from birth to 18 years. Pediatric diseases recognized as “rare” affect under 200,000 people in the U.S. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher Program is intended to address the challenges that drug companies face when developing treatments for these unique patient populations. Under this program, companies are eligible to

Breast cancer survivor urges women to get regular screenings and mammograms, thanks local non-profit ‘The Rose’

The first time Ediana Quijada found a lump in her breast, she was laughed off and told “it was happening because of her period and nothing to worry about.”

It was far from nothing. After a six-year battle with metastatic breast cancer, the cheerful Houston native is happy to share her story with other young women, advising regular breast exams, early detection having made a key difference in many cases.

In the fall of 2012, 29-year-old Ediana was finishing her construction management internship at the University of Houston.

The internship did not offer health insurance but UH hosts free mammography screenings in October in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month. However, when she told the nurses about her lump, they assured her, with a cursory glance, that she was too young to worry about cancer. She was sent away without a mammogram.

Reassured and a little abashed about being paranoid, she busied herself with assignments as the stresses of the semester took over. The second of four siblings (two sisters, one little brother), Ediana said she had no reason to suspect the worst because there was no history of cancer in her family.

But the lump wouldn’t stay quiet.


“I started feeling that the little lump was getting bigger and bigger,” Ediana said. “I could measure it; it was an inch now. Or is it in my head? Then I would calculate, my period must be coming, that’s why the lump’s getting big … and my breast is turning pink.”

A visit with her mother’s doctor in December confirmed the devastating news — a large mass in her breast. Could be a tumor. Clearly, the cancer had made good use of the two-month delay.

“I didn’t have insurance, so my mother took me to a walk-in clinic,” Eidana said. “The doctor said, ‘oh my God, why didn’t you come before?’”

A few hours and one $100-ultrasound later, she was advised to do a biopsy.

“The biopsy cost over $2,000, I thought ‘I can’t do that right now,’ and he (the doctor) referred me to The Rose,” Ediana said.

That first encounter with The Rose marked the beginning of Ediana’s long, painful but ultimately successful battle with breast cancer. A Houston-based nonprofit group, The Rose provides breast cancer screenings and treatment regardless of patients’ ability to pay. They began Ediana’s treatment by conducting another ultrasound, this one costing only $10.

A little monster inside your breast.

Ediana was paired with a patient navigator who helped her through the system and set up her appointments.

“It turns out I was Stage 3, Type C, which is borderline Stage 4,” said Ediana. “Very aggressive and very bad. They said, ‘it looks like you have a little monster inside’.”

Given the tumor’s massive size, treatment had to begin immediately. When three painful rounds of chemo (each lasting around eight months), one round of radiation and one surgery failed to eliminate the cancer, her doctors put Ediana on an–at the time–experimental drug called T-DM1.

“This

Dentist Fortitude Valley, Precision Dental, Offers General and Cosmetic Dentistry Solutions in a Caring and Friendly Environment in QLD – Press Release

Dentist Fortitude Valley, Precision Dental, Offers General and Cosmetic Dentistry Solutions in a Caring and Friendly Environment in QLD

Fortitude Valley, QLD – Not every dentist is the same. There are those that will only be concerned about providing treatment while there are others that will go above and beyond in ensuring that patients are feeling comfortable. Precision Dental is a modern dental practice that is based at the heart of Brisbane servicing Fortitude Valley and is committed to high-quality dental care. The practice provides both general and cosmetic dental treatment for the whole family.

“Our ultra-modern practice is conveniently located in HQ Towers which offer free onsite parking for the duration of treatment. Emergency appointments are available throughout the day and Saturday appointments can be arranged. We are equipped with the latest generation of equipment and pride ourselves in providing thorough dental treatment that is tailored to individual needs and goals.” Said Dr Billy Choi, the spokesperson for the clinic, regarding their unrivalled services.

The dental practice was founded on three key principles including honesty, patient comfort, and quality. Every member of the staff will ensure that patients are comfortable right from the moment they walk in their office. The clinic uses the latest generation of quiet equipment to ensure that dental visits are enjoyable. Some of the tools that can be found in the treatment room to make patients relax include:


Parents can rest easy knowing that the clinic offers children’s dental emergency treatments. Children have high energy and are always going to be susceptible to dental emergencies. The dentists have knowledge in dealing with such unexpected events and will ensure that children are not experiencing discomfort a minute longer. The practice applies advanced skills in dentistry and state-of-the-art equipment to overcome dental emergencies.

The clinic also aims at being the leading cosmetic dentistry treatment provider in Fortitude Valley, one smile at a time. The treatment options are tailored to meet the individual needs of the patient. A good dentist Fortitude Valley is one that will start by assessing the individual needs of the patient before coming up with a course of action and this is exactly what you get when you reach out to Precision Dental. Getting a smile makeover will help in maintaining a youthful appearance and also boosts the self-confidence of a person. Patients can enjoy all of these benefits by booking a dental appointment with Precision Dental at their own convenient time.

The clinic also believes in providing education to patients because good dental care requires a holistic approach. The clinic believes that a dentist should be a partner when it comes to the wellbeing of the teeth, gums, and mouth. Precision Dental provides patients with both basic and advanced information so that they’re establishing a consistent and reliable oral care routine. It is also easy for patients to book an appointment when they visit their website.

Precision Dental is located at S13, HQ South Tower, 520 Wickham St, Fortitude Valley, QLD 4006. For enquiries regarding the top-rated dentist Fortitude Valley and the services offered, contact their team by calling (07) 3852 1160

Khloe Kardashian’s fitness schedule kept her ‘sane’

Khloe Kardashian’s fitness schedule kept her “sane” during lockdown.



Khloe Kardashian standing in front of a brick wall


© Bang Showbiz
Khloe Kardashian

The ‘Keeping Up With The Kardashians’ star admits there have been some “crazy times” in the world because of the coronavirus pandemic but she has turned to exercise to keep her going and keep her mental state positive too.

Gallery: Bachelorettes Unite! 13 Alumni Reveal What They’ve Learned on Their Journeys to Finding Love (People)

Explaining about her fitness regime, she said: “I definitely think because of my fitness journey and already having such a regimented schedule when it comes to working out, it kind of kept me sane during these crazy times. I had to learn to adapt by doing mommy-daughter workouts. [True] is obviously not working out, but it’s things like me putting her in a wagon and sprinting up a hill. I belted a wagon to my waist because I don’t have any help. We’re all just trying to figure it out.”

And the 36-year-old reality television star wants to set a good example for her daughter True when it comes to her exercise regime and she hopes her daughter will be “active and take care of herself” like her mom.

Speaking to Refinery29, she added of her lifestyle: “I want to show my daughter, by example, that there are healthy ways to be active every day.

“You don’t have to be so rigid in the gym. I like to work out early, it just sets the tone for the rest of my day, it makes me want to eat better and be active and healthy. By her seeing me like this, I hope she’s active and takes care of herself.”

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Summa Equity Acquires Sengenics to Advance Precision Medicine Through Proteomics

Summa Equity, the purpose-driven private equity firm that invests to solve global challenges, has acquired a majority stake in Sengenics, a functional proteomics company with a proprietary technology called KREX that enables researchers to vastly improve the understanding of the human proteome and immune system. Proteomics, i.e. the large-scale study of proteins, is one of the most important areas for gaining insights into human biology and disease, as protein expressions, structures and functions are critical in reflecting states of health.

Sengenics was first founded in 2008 and went on to commercialise the KREX technology that was originally developed from a joint collaboration between the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford. The company’s patented KREX technology enables researchers to address both the function and folding structure of proteins using one technology that allows for large numbers of proteins to be studied simultaneously, with high sensitivity and specificity. The combination of these capabilities makes KREX unique. The technology is relevant for a broad range of applications in research and throughout the value chain for drugs, vaccines and diagnostics. Sengenics is currently mainly focused on autoantibody detection for applications in autoimmune diseases, oncology and infectious diseases, including COVID-19. The company recently launched a unique high-throughput, multi-antigen, multi-domain and fully quantitative COVID-19 test, leveraging the KREX technology.

Sengenics has grown rapidly in recent years and established customer relationships with top global pharmaceutical companies, and leading research and academic institutions around the world. The company currently has commercial partnerships with 9 out of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies to co-develop complementary and companion diagnostic tests for autoimmune and cancer immunotherapy drugs. Sengenics is based in Europe and South-East Asia.

“Sengenics’ proprietary technology unlocks tremendous potential for researchers around the world to further their understanding of biology and disease,” says Tommi Unkuri, Partner at Summa Equity. “We are proud to partner with the company and support its journey, as it looks to expand its position in the market and grow its business. We look forward to supporting the Sengenics team in our shared ambition to invest to drive product development, global expansion and accelerated adoption.”

Summa Equity invests in companies that address global challenges, while managing environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors, with the aim of increasing returns and reducing risk. It was the first company to align its investments with the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The investment in Sengenics is aligned with the firm’s Changing Demographics theme and supports the SDG Target #3: “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”, by enabling improved diagnosis, treatment and patient outcomes across a number of disease areas.

“We are excited to welcome Summa Equity as a major strategic investor and shareholder in Sengenics. Their extensive capabilities and alignment with our vision of changing the future of medicine through immune-proteomics is a very strong strategic fit. Summa also has a great deal of relevant knowledge and experience to be a value-added owner for us given its ownership of Olink Proteomics. This